Community living, social values, and the built environment: a study focus on Indigenous Community of Meiteis of Manipur

Volume: 10 | Issue: 01 | Year 2024 | Subscription
International Journal of Housing and Human Settlement Planning
Received Date: 04/22/2024
Acceptance Date: 04/26/2024
Published On: 2024-05-05
First Page: 68
Last Page: 76

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By: Dwijomala Hanjabam and Sachin Yadav

1,2 Assistant Professor, Department of Planning and Architecture, Mizoram University, Mizoram, India

Abstract

Abstract: A dwelling unit or a house and its relation to the built environment is a research area that has not seen a clear translation into an implementable level policy in India or elsewhere. The reason behind these gaps could be also the lack of a study focus area or a unique name that could link these researches to become an impactful study that policy makers and development agencies could refer to. On the other hand, the term sustainability is widely known; however, the term is more often used and understood in the context of protection of the environment. In the recent past, the definition of sustainability is being examined to include and represent various complexities of human society and its environment. The fundamental concept of sustainability revolves around preserving our resources for the benefit of future generations. This pertains not only to the environment, economy, and urban areas but also places significant emphasis on the culture and community living, which is increasingly being acknowledged as a crucial component in sustainable development too. Vernacular settlements also referred to as traditional settlements, are renowned for their intricate symbiotic and interdependent dynamics. These settlements are not just environmentally sustainable but economically, socially, and culturally sustainable too. The paper attempts to bring forth the core idea of vernacular settlement which still exhibits a strong sense of community living and the need for it to be addressed in social housing policies in rural areas which still showcases these characteristics. The methodology of the study includes a keyword co-occurrence analysis to highlight the concerned research area coming into focus, a study of traditional settlement of Northeast India to understand the linkages of social values, community living and sustainability and concluding it with social housing schemes need for a more holistic approach to preserve these systems.

Keywords: Traditional settlement, Community living, Built environment, social values, Sustainable development

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Citation:

How to cite this article: Dwijomala Hanjabam and Sachin Yadav, Community living, social values, and the built environment: a study focus on Indigenous Community of Meiteis of Manipur. International Journal of Housing and Human Settlement Planning. 2024; 10(01): 68-76p.

How to cite this URL: Dwijomala Hanjabam and Sachin Yadav, Community living, social values, and the built environment: a study focus on Indigenous Community of Meiteis of Manipur. International Journal of Housing and Human Settlement Planning. 2024; 10(01): 68-76p. Available from:https://journalspub.com/publication/community-living-social-values-and-the-built-environment-a-study-focus-on-indigenous-community-of-meiteis-of-manipur/

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