A Cross sectional study to assess the associated factors on bottle feeding among mother of infant at selected rural slum area of District, Rohtak.

By:

Charu, Shakuntla Devi, and Rachna Kadian

Volume: 10 | Issue: 01 | Year 2024 | Subscription
International Journal of Pediatric Nursing
Received Date: 01/03/2024
Acceptance Date: 03/02/2024
Published On: 2024-03-27
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Citation:
Charu, Shakuntla Devi, and Rachna Kadian A Cross sectional study to assess the associated factors on bottle feeding among mother of infant at selected rural slum area of District, Rohtak. International Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 2024; 10(01): -p.
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: WHO developed recommendations for exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months, safe complementary foods after that & avoidance of bottle feeding. The prevalence of bottle feeding varies among different nations. There is a lack of data from India regarding the diverse factors contributing to the practice of bottle feeding. Various reasons for bottle feeding mentioned by mothers were illness, breast problems & perception of insufficient milk. Whatever, may be the reason for selection of bottle feeding by mother, WHO recommends avoidance of bottle feeding & breastfeeding in all mothers including HIV positive mother. Artificial feeding in any form is harmful for baby and mother. According to a study conducted by Chen et al, preterm infants exhibited significantly higher levels of oxygen saturation and body temperature when directly breastfed as opposed to bottle feeding. Therefore, breastfeeding appears to be a more physiological feeding method for preterm infants, while bottle feeding may be associated with increased stress. Use of bottle, even among initially breast-fed children interferes negatively with oral development. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY: 1. To find out the associated factors on bottle feeding on bottle feeding among the mother of infant at selected rural slum area of District, Rohtak. 2. To find the association between Bottle feeding with selected demographic variables among the mother of infant at selected rural slum area of District, Rohtak. METHODOLOGY: For this study Cross-sectional research design was selected, data collection was from 13:03:2022 to 16:04:2022, the sample for the study were selected from Selected Rural Slum area, Rohtak. The researcher employed convenience sampling to select a sample size of 60. A Structured Checklist was utilized to gather data on risk factors, and the interview method was employed. The collected data was analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: The Result showed That: SECTION-A: Distribution of frequency and percentage demographic characteristics SECTION-B: Distribution of frequency and percentage of risk factor. SECTION-C: The environmental risk factor on bottle feeding association with selected demographic variable Finding of the analysis on bottle feeding with selected demographic variable show that there was found to be significantly at 0.05 level of significant. CONCLUSION: The present study aims to assess the associated risk factor on bottle feeding among mother of infants at selected Rural Slum area, Rohtak. From the findings of the data analysis, it is clear that the health and biological risk factors are associated with bottle feeding.

KEY WORDS: Cross-sectional study, bottle feeding, infant, Rural, Slum area, risk factors, mothers

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Citation:

Charu, Shakuntla Devi, and Rachna Kadian A Cross sectional study to assess the associated factors on bottle feeding among mother of infant at selected rural slum area of District, Rohtak. International Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 2024; 10(01): -p.

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