Investigating Postnatal Depression and “Baby Blues” in New Mothers at a Selected Maternity Hospital

By:

Swapnil Madhukar Mhaske, Dhananjay Shravan Wable, Vaishnavi Balasaheb Tupe, Nilesh Ramesh Bhalerao, Gaurav Rajaram Jaware, and Somnath Gopale

Volume: 10 | Issue: 01 | Year 2024 | Subscription
International Journal of Nursing Critical Care
Received Date: 02/21/2024
Acceptance Date: 03/17/2024
Published On: 2024-03-28
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Citation:
Swapnil Madhukar Mhaske, Dhananjay Shravan Wable, Vaishnavi Balasaheb Tupe, Nilesh Ramesh Bhalerao, Gaurav Rajaram Jaware, and Somnath Gopale Investigating Postnatal Depression and “Baby Blues” in New Mothers at a Selected Maternity Hospital International Journal of Nursing Critical Care. 2024; 10(01): -p.
Abstract

Background: The postpartum period is marked by significant physical and emotional transitions that can lead to feelings of anxiety and mood swings. Postpartum mood disturbances can be categorized into three levels of severity. Symptoms commonly associated with these disorders include feelings of hopelessness, sadness, nausea, alterations in sleep and appetite, reduced sexual interest, frequent crying, anxiety, irritability, a sense of isolation, emotional volatility, thoughts of self-harm or harming the infant, and even suicidal ideation. Postpartum depression may begin at any point within the first year after childbirth and can persist for a number of years. It’s reported that between 50% to 80% of new mothers experience postpartum blues, which typically arises within the initial days following birth. Material and Methods: A descriptive study was conducted at Seva Nursing College, Shrirampur, involving 100 postnatal mothers selected through purposive sampling to evaluate postpartum depression and blues following childbirth. Data collection was carried out via a semi-structured interview lasting approximately 40 minutes by a nurse researcher. Both descriptive and inferential statistical methods were used to analyze the collected data.Result: A total of 100 mothers were including in the study. Study revealed that (51%) of the mothers under the study were 22-25 of age, (58%) of the mothers belongs to nuclear family, (42%) of mothers were from rural area however (35%) were belongs to semi urban area, mean score for postpartum depression (+27.23) indicate severe depression, for postpartum blue (+5.36) indicate moderate postpartum blue. It indicates that student under study had severe level of postpartum blue and moderate level of depression. Conclusion: Majority of the mothers had most of the symptoms of postpartum blue and moderate level of postpartum depression.

Keywords: Assess, Postpartum Depression, Baby Blue Symptoms, and Postnatal Women’s

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Citation:

Swapnil Madhukar Mhaske, Dhananjay Shravan Wable, Vaishnavi Balasaheb Tupe, Nilesh Ramesh Bhalerao, Gaurav Rajaram Jaware, and Somnath Gopale Investigating Postnatal Depression and “Baby Blues” in New Mothers at a Selected Maternity Hospital International Journal of Nursing Critical Care. 2024; 10(01): -p.

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